Tag Archives: Baseball

Back to (the) Tokyo Part 3

30 Aug

Day 15: Ramen, Pokemon and Ninjas

That morning we got up early to wait in line for ramen at Nakiryu, which (along with Tsuta) is a one-Michelin starred-ramen restaurant in Tokyo that only costs $10-15 a meal. We arrived over an hour before it opened on a rainy weekday and we were 5th and 6th in line.

Waiting in line was a surprisingly non-terrible experience. We chatted to some Americans near us, and it was interesting seeing how many people joined the queue and when. This was the line just before Nakiryu opened (bearing in mind that there are only 10 seats inside):IMG_20180705_111828They handed out menus shortly before the restaurant opened, and James used ours to help him order at the ramen machine.IMG_20180705_113508After he paid at the machine he gave the receipts to the guy behind the counter. That’s how you order at all Michelin restaurants, right?

James got the signature tantanmen (a sesame/red pepper ramen) with thick slices of braised pork, soy-dipped egg and shrimp wontons:MVIMG_20180705_114909I ordered the sanramen (hot and sour ramen) with the egg and regular pork.
MVIMG_20180705_114848We each strongly preferred our own ramen but I have to admit that James’ thick-sliced pork was insane.  

The kitchen worked in complete silence, which was impressive but a little unsettling. Also it wasn’t a leisurely meal – like at every popular ramen joint in Tokyo we had to eat quickly so the people behind us could get in. People didn’t really talk, and mainly all you could hear was the sound of cooking and customers appreciatively slurping ramen.

It was really, really delicious though, and definitely worth doing just for the novelty of having a cheapo Michelin starred meal. That thick-cut pork, OMG.

After our early lunch we walked to the Pokemon Megastore in Ikebukuro. We got a bit lost in the shopping center and had to ask for directions, but looking back we probably should have been able to figure it out for ourselves:MVIMG_20180705_142145 A wall of pokemon:IMG_20180705_123526 Here we are with some old favourites:IMG_20180705_124433(Yes I am aware that I should have been peeking over James’ other shoulder. It bugs me a lot).

It was fun walking around and looking at all the cool merchandise and peeking at what other people had put in their baskets (mostly plushies).

This is Pikachu wearing the skins of his defeated enemies: IMG_20180705_124724I spent a lot of the time messaging Cat, asking which pokemon were which. She answered my questions very patiently but eventually sent back an exasperated “OMG why are you even in the pokemon store if you don’t know anything about pokemon??”

James was very excited by these pokeballs with mystery pokemon inside. He bought two, hoping for either Pikachu and Eevee. He got … Pikachu and Eevee! What a lucky cricket:
IMG_20180705_141751I was also sucked into trying my luck with these cool tins. I bought four and only got one repeat (which was the awesome one in the bottom left so I’m OK with that):IMG_20180705_135814I bought a Mimikyu soft toy for Cat and some more snacks that came in decorative tins.

After we checked out, James (and several other guys) got super distracted by these pokemon gachapon:
IMG_20180705_140821Once again James got the exact gachapon he was after. Perhaps he does have the luck of the nine-tailed fox after all!

We did some random shopping afterwards, where James was entranced with this nesting Totoro toy:
Totoro We also found more cat hat gachapon! Flowers: IMG_20180705_155941And what I assume are Valentine’s Day hats:
IMG_20180705_155927I was also happy because we found a squeeze toy I was hunting! I saw these at Tokyu Hands in Shibuya and fell in love with the eggplant one but they didn’t have any for sale. =( Fortunately they were available at the Ikebukuro location:IMG_20180705_161349 (1)(There’s a gap at the back because I snagged the last eggplant before taking the photo).

When I first saw it I went from “hah, that eggplant is really dumb – I wonder what it feels like” to “OMG I must have it”. It is tactilely delightful.

It was a wonderful afternoon full of gachapon and eggplant luck.

In the evening we went to a ninja restaurant in Asakusa. It was super cheesy but also super fun. This was James at our table in the ninja village:
IMG_20180705_192446The dishes were a mixture of ninja-themed and just ninja-named. James ordered the set course which came with several ninja-themed dishes, like these shuriken crackers:IMG_20180705_194027I asked our waiter what meal had the coolest presentation and he recommended this ninja chicken:

=D

They had an awesome “ninja magician” come by and do sleight of hand tricks. The table next to us also had a magician so we got to see multiple magic tricks.

At the end of the night they gave us a complimentary snow frog dessert to celebrate our 10th anniversary. =)
MVIMG_20180705_213257(A month early, but we figured it counted because the whole trip was basically our anniversary gift to each other!)

Afterwards we headed to Bar Benfiddich. It’s supposed to be one of the best bars in Asia, and is one of those places where the bartender makes you a drink based on your flavour preferences.

James and the owner/bartender, Hiroyasu Kayama:IMG_20180706_010028We were at the counter so were able to chat a bit, and found out that his apprentice/assistant was entering a cocktail competition in Yokohama. We ended up talking to Miyoshi for ages about cocktail-making, and she told us about the preparation involved for the competition. Something that totally blew our minds was that in Japan, artistry (or, what Google translated as “beautiful movement”) is an important part of bartending. All the bartenders we saw were dressed in suits and moved very precisely when measuring, pouring, and creating cocktails. And of course, there’s the Japanese Hard Shake, which is very cool to watch. Movement/artistry is much less of a priority in the US, where bartenders – even high-end ones – are quite casual.

We asked Miyoshi to make her competition cocktail for us (which she had to get the owner’s permission to do):
IMG_20180706_003324 It was called Fleur de Soie, and had lavender and fresh lime juice, and it was very tasty, refreshing and not too floral. I looked up the competition results later – she didn’t win. =(

It was a really memorable night and I enjoyed learning a bit more about Japanese cocktail-making. I think it was my favourite of the bars we went to in Japan (James also enjoyed it but preferred High Five in Ginza and the Ritz-Carlton bar in Kyoto).

Day 16: Art and Baseball

The next morning we lined up at Narikura to try what is almost unanimously agreed-on as the best tonkatsu in Tokyo. This time we only had to arrive ~40 minutes early to get into the first seating. It was a promising sign that most people in the line were Japanese.

James ordered the Kiramugi and I ordered the snow-aged pork. The quality of the pork was amazing – mine was more tender but James’ had the better flavour.
IMG_20180706_112220I think Narikura was noticeably superior to even a good tonkatsu place like Maisen. But the wait at Maisen was much shorter, and I don’t know if I’m enough of a tonkatsu connoisseur to make it worth the wait. I was glad we tried it though!

After lunch we took a train to the Yayoi Kusama Museum. I’d booked tickets a couple of months in advance and, like the Ghibli Museum tickets, they sell out very quickly.

The highlight was definitely the pumpkin infinity room; also known by its full name: Pumpkins Screaming about Love Beyond Infinity.
MVIMG_20180706_141220It was really interesting – an employee would let just you/your group into the room, and you had it to yourselves for two minutes. The exhibit itself was very small, but the angle of the mirrors made it look like a huge field of pumpkins. The museum was very popular, so it was nice to have that intimate experience with just me, James and infinite glowing pumpkins (screaming about love).

We wanted to go in again but when we exited there were already 10+ people waiting. We hadn’t had to wait at all for our turn – I guess we’d gotten there at the perfect time. Oh well.

We continued on to the rooftop pumpkin, which was the other part of the museum where you were allowed to take photographs:
MVIMG_20180706_141610It was a very small museum. We spent about 30-40 minutes there and that was with backtracking and looking at some of the paintings twice. I felt like it was worth the $9 we paid – especially for the pumpkin room! – but much more than that would have felt like a bit of a rip-off.

We had an afternoon break and then went to Tokyo Dome to watch a baseball game.MVIMG_20180706_181913We had several friends recommend seeing a Japanese baseball game and I’d definitely agree it’s a must-do. Japanese baseball is sooo much more interesting than American baseball. The fans are much more interactive – they had synchronised flag-waving, individual chants for different players, and even a brass band!

We went in barracking for the Yomiuri Giants (since they’re the closest thing to the San Francisco Giants) but were won over by the superior chants of the Hiroshima Carp. MVIMG_20180706_195519The game itself wasn’t that exciting (poor James was in a line for the bathroom for the sole home run that was hit) but the enthusiasm from the crowd was infectious and it was fun chanting along with them.

Day 17: Harajuku

We had deliberately saved Harajuku for one of the last days of our trip in case I went crazy and bought a ton of stuff.

I managed to restrain myself, but did buy an awesome Junya Watanabe top at a fancy consignment store. Look how much room there is inside! That’s how you can tell it’s posh.
IMG_20180707_115906We really enjoyed (well, as much as you can “enjoy” it given the heat) strolling around Cat street and the surrounding area.

This is James wondering why I made him go up the stairs for this photo:
MVIMG_20180707_134914_1Some of the stores had really interesting interiors:
MVIMG_20180707_112914(And they all had air conditioning so it was always a relief to go inside).

Even the exterior of some of the buildings was unusual. The one was half-building, half-vase! MVIMG_20180707_113822A guy walking down the street looked to see what we were admiring, then also started taking photos. =)

We also braved Takeshita street, but it was insanely crowded and the stores were a lot more cutesy, which isn’t really my style. I do want to go back for some jiggly pancakes one day though!

After our afternoon of shopping we had dinner at Den, which has two Michelin stars (though a lot pricier than Nakiryu!) and is based on traditional Japanese cuisine but with a fun, modern interpretation. I’ll make a separate post about it because it’s quite photo heavy. It was quite difficult to get a reservation, but totally worth it, and the meal was one of our highlights in Japan. =)

Day 18: Studio Ghibli and Steak

We started off the day with more conveyor belt sushi. Breakfast of champions!
MVIMG_20180708_115210I followed this man and his cat down the streets of Shibuya until James got me back on route:MVIMG_20180708_122804To get on a train to head to the Ghibli Museum. It wasn’t as cute as a little Tokyo shoulder cat, but it was pretty cute:
IMG_20180708_133357We weren’t allowed to take photos indoors, which was actually a really good policy because the museum was already very busy and if we’d had to wait for everyone to take photos it would have been even worse.

We could take photos outdoors though. This was the staircase to the roof:MVIMG_20180708_135318Which was where the Iron Giant lived:
MVIMG_20180708_135604We also explored the (very crowded!) gift shop and a very detailed special exhibit about the different ways food is depicted in Studio Ghibli films. Also we saw a short film about a little caterpillar in a special cinema there which was pretty fun.

Then we walked back to the station to go to Steakhouse Satou where we had a fabulous Matsusaka steak dinner. Matsusaka beef is like Kobe beef but more well-known in Japan than internationally.

The beef before cooking:
IMG_20180708_163727And after:
MVIMG_20180708_165058It was melt-in-your-mouth tender and amazing. 

Steakhouse Satou is also well-known for its Matsusaka beef croquettes, which they sell at their stall downstairs. There was a huge line, but it moved quickly. IMG_20180708_171604We were quite full from our steaks but managed to make room for a single croquette between us. The croquette was really, really good – for sure worth getting if you’re in the area and don’t quite have the budget for steak.
IMG_20180708_172931
We had an early night, making sure to get plenty of rest for the next day, which was going to be our second (and final) attempt to get to the top of Mt Fuji.

Five Days in Boston!

23 May

James had to go to Boston for a work trip and we decided that I’d tag along and we’d make a mini trip of it. =)

We stayed at the Liberty Hotel, which is a former prison that housed, among others, Malcolm X. The hotel was gorgeous but we had a ton of problems with the a/c, the customer service was pretty ineffective, and overall I wouldn’t recommend staying there. At least the lobby was gorgeous:
IMG_20180513_151143
Day 1

We arrived in the afternoon and went straight to Harpoon Brewery for a tour. Behold our incredibly stylish eye protection!
IMG_20180513_163424The tour was really fun and great value – it was only $5 and included an explanation of the beer-making process, a tour of the facilities, and about 10-15 minutes of unlimited beer/cider tasting. James and I were so full afterwards.

I don’t know why James is looking so sneaky in the tasting room:
IMG_20180513_165755 The beer on tap. Their apple cider was really good – even James liked it. IMG_20180513_171215
After the tour we split a giant pretzel (made with Harpoon IPA) which was delicious, and went on a Duck tour of Boston.

I think the Duck tour is good to do at the start of your trip because it’s a nice overview of Boston. Also when we got on the water James got to steer the Duck!
IMG_20180513_184303He got a congratulatory sticker afterwards. It’s hard to read in the picture but it says “I drove a Duck”
IMG_20180513_184644Two other people took a turn after him but they weren’t as good and the captain kept having to correct it when they oversteered. At the end of the tour the captain told James he’d done a good job and James was so very pleased.

Then we took an Uber to Somerville where we ate at Highland Kitchen and had drinks at backbar. Towards the end of the night when it slowed down we got to see the bartenders teaching the hostess how to make a couple of drinks and that was pretty fun and a nice way to end our first day in Boston. =)

Day 2

On our second day we walked the Freedom Trail. You can do an organised tour but we just followed the brick trail around the city and downloaded an app that explained the historical significance of all the different stops. It’s probably the number one tourist attraction you should do in Boston, and it’s completely free!

The Granary Burying Ground – we really liked how the building loomed over the cemetery:
IMG_20180514_095318We started around 9:30am, which was a bit early to get into the State House, but did time it pretty well for us to get to Neptune Oyster 20 minutes before it opened and before a huge line formed. It was a Monday morning and by the time they opened the line had extended to the end of the street (almost double the length in the picture, but the big truck blocked the rest of the line):
IMG_20180514_111410From my research it was almost universally agreed that Neptune Oyster has the best lobster rolls in Boston. We ordered fried clams and, of course, a lobster roll each: IMG_20180514_121036They were pretty good, but having tried a couple now (one in SF and one in Boston), I think I don’t really “get” lobster rolls. They’re OK but if this is the best one I now know I wouldn’t wait in line for one. I guess I’m just not that into lobster.

Unfortunately all the butter made James feel really sick and we walked pretty slowly for the next hour. We saw Paul Revere’s house and the Old North Church, which is the “one if by land, two if by sea” church. IMG_20180516_120839By the time we got to the Bunker Hill Monument James was feeling a bit better. On the way I helped some lady with directions using Google Maps and while I did that, James took some selfies with this fish:
IMG_20180514_131740 There were two selfies, because the first one he had his tongue on the wrong side. I appreciate that he corrected it. IMG_20180514_131714I think James likes things with their tongues out because they remind him of Mouse:
IMG_20180501_143345Anyway, we headed to Bunker Hill Monument and got some (free) tickets to climb it:
IMG_20180514_135645There were 294 steps to the top and it’s definitely worth doing (unless you’re claustrophobic). The views were great.
IMG_20180514_140618We finished at the Charleston Naval Yard. The USS Constitution was closed but we got to see the USS Cassin Young, a submarine destroyer.
IMG_20180514_144742 James was fascinated by the missiles, and it was pretty cool getting to look around the (very cramped) ship. IMG_20180514_145938Then we went to the USS Constitution Museum which was kind of eh. If I’d known we were going to get held up at the hotel later I would have just skipped it.

When we went back to the Liberty we went to the front desk where they said they’d fixed the a/c issue and would call us in 10 minutes when we got back to the room to check. We fell asleep waiting for the call, only to be woken up by it 2 hours later when they finally remembered us. In that time it had gotten hot again because the fix had just been temporary, so they said they’d send someone up with a key to another room. We waited 45 minutes, called again, and they finally sent someone up. But that was a ton of time wasted, and we had to do the Skywalk Observatory at night instead of sunset like we’d hoped. =/ At least our second room had a nicer view.
IMG_20180517_200142I’d definitely recommend doing the Skywalk Observatory during the day. You can’t see the water at night and the audio guide kept referring to buildings by their colour, which obviously we couldn’t see. Also the lights inside the building reflected off the glass, making it kind of hard to see.

We had late dinner and drinks at Toro, which was really good (and still busy even at 10pm).

Day 3

This was one of James’ work days so I slept in, then did some shopping on Newbury street in the afternoon. Later I met up with James and his colleagues at Yvonne’s, where we had pre-game drinks.IMG_20180515_194445 My drink came with a giant marshmallow to toast! IMG_20180515_200136We had dinner at Fenway Park where I of course had a Fenway Frank.
IMG_20180515_211323 James got a pretzel, which he was very pleased about. IMG_20180515_222422Also, are you ready to see the most low-energy nachos – and yes, I’m comfortable saying this – in the history of the world? They are so terrible. You think you can imagine how shit they are, but you cannot.
IMG_20180515_213043My God.

The game started late because of the rain and we left before the end because it was obvious the A’s were going to win, and the others had work the next morning. On the way out we found a Kaye sign!
IMG_20180515_235245
Day 4

James had work again so I went to the North End to compare cannolis from Mike’s and Modern. I have had like, two cannolis in my life, but decided I would give my opinion on the great Boston rivalry.

Mike’s:
MikeMike’s had a ton of flavours like hazelnut, limoncello and amaretto (which is the one I got). I really liked the taste and the cannoli was absolutely massive.

After I finished that monster the last thing I wanted was more cannoli but nevertheless I persevered and went to Modern:Modern
Modern was smaller (like maybe 3/4 of the size) and I imagine more traditional, with no weird flavours on offer. I liked that they filled the cannoli to order rather than having them sitting out in the pastry case.

Overall Modern was probably the better cannoli – the shell was crisper and more delicate and the ricotta filling was very light. I also preferred the smaller size. But I really like amaretto so I liked the flavour of Mike’s cannoli more, even though I think it is the inferior cannoli.

After my cannoli comparison I met up with James and we headed to Google where James had to dial into a meeting.

One of the Google microkitchens was Cheers themed!
IMG_20180516_151300“Sometimes you want to go where everybody knows your LDAP”IMG_20180516_151227The buildings were quite nice and compact. We found some teacups and a (non-working photo booth):
IMG_20180516_153538While James had his meeting I went and explored MIT. It has a cool little museum that I wouldn’t go out of my way for, but is a nice way to pass 30-60 minutes. They had a bunch of robotics exhibits but this was by far my favourite thing:
IMG_20180516_164523“It will take 13.7 billion years (the approximate age of the universe) for the last gear to complete one rotation”. I spent a lot of time watching those gears.

Then we headed back to the hotel to relax a bit before our dinner at Giulia. I separated that dinner into its own post because this one was getting too long, but Giulia was phenomenal – James said the best meal he’s ever had and it was probably top three for me. 

Day 5

This was our last proper day in Boston. We started it at the Museum of Science and the hour we had to ourselves was really fun, but then a billion school groups descended on the museum and it was terrible.

I’m in space!
IMG_20180517_102033Here James is riding some sort of lever-operated wheelchair.
IMG_20180517_102940This exhibit used an Xbox Kinect to sense our movement and we could interact with the stuff on screen:Burst_Cover_GIF_Action_20180517103244The main reason we went to the Museum of Science was for the lightning show. I’ve never seen lightning up close before and it was really cool and worth braving the hordes of screaming school kids to see. I didn’t get any pictures of the lightning but here is the machine that created it:
IMG_20180517_105046Afterwards we went to Fenway Park to do a tour. The guide told us about the history of the stadium, and we got to see the original (very uncomfortable!) seats, the press area and sit in the Green Monster seats:
IMG_20180517_132115(I think our seats the other night were in the lower section in the centre-left of the photo)

During the tour our guide talked about Jackie Robinson and how he broke the colour barrier. We all nodded knowingly except James, who asked what the colour barrier was, and everyone seemed very shocked. Later:

Me: Are you embarrassed that you didn’t know about the colour barrier?
James: (disdainfully) No. They’re the ones who should be embarrassed they even had a colour barrier.

In the evening we had a lateish dinner at Aria Trattoria in the North End. It was pretty good – but the food and service were a couple of significant steps down from Giulia while the price was only a single step down. (Giulia has ruined pasta for me forever). Then we went and picked up some pastries from Mike’s to take back to the hotel to eat.

We got cocktails at the bar then headed to the catwalk to eat and drink. The lobster tail from Mike’s had come highly recommended and we were both insanely disappointed to discover that it’s just pastry-wrapped cream. Look how excited I was before I tasted it:
IMG_20180517_225038Afterwards we headed back to the hotel room to pack and grab a few hours of sleep before heading to the airport the next morning.

And that was our time in Boston. =) I think we packed a lot in considering James had to work a couple of those days. The old buildings in Boston are gorgeous and I like how walkable the city is. James had some productive meetings, we ate and drank a ton, and we learned a bit more about the American revolution. All in all a very satisfying trip!

Bay Area Holiday: Days 1& 2

8 Aug

James and I just came back from 5 days in the Bay Area. We met up with Joel and his fiancee Nancy before they moved back to Australia, and it was so, so awesome. We stayed at Nancy’s parents’ house in Fremont (which was near Silicon Valley and San Jose) for the first two nights and then moved to Nob Hill in SF. I normally micromanage our holidays but this time went a bit loosey goosey.

Day 1: baseball game and Golden Gate Bridge
Day 2: Joel and Nancy’s engagement party
Day 3: Tour of Kink.com and House of Prime Rib
Day 4: California Academy of Sciences and Google
Day 5: 
Pixar, Lombard street and Union Square

You’ll notice that it’s missing some pretty traditional SF tourist attractions (Alcatraz, Fisherman’s Wharf and the Exploratorium) but we decided to save those for next time because we definitely want to go back.

I think SF is absolutely beautiful – I love the fog and all those hills.

Oh and just as a quick aside, we had the best flight experience with Southwest Airlines! They don’t have assigned seating but they do have assigned boarding so it’s first come first served. I checked in almost exactly 24 hours before our flight so after all the passengers with status and those who had paid for earlier boarding we were 44th and 45th in line. We both figured we’d get seats in the middle of the plane but there were actually 2 available seats in the second row.

I think nobody took them because there was a little old lady in the aisle seat, and it was easier to just go 1 or 2 rows back instead of making her stand up. But the plane was going to be full, so we figured that we might as well be the ones to get the second row seats! It made getting off the plane so much faster and we were both really pleased.

But *ahem* back to the holiday.

Baseball Game

We went straight from the airport to a baseball game. It was the Oakland A’s vs the Texas Rangers. There was a big crowd (I don’t know if it was actually big, but definitely big compared to some of the Seattle baseball crowds that I’ve seen!) and a great atmosphere. It was fun when the ball flew into the crowd and you’d see people jostling for the best position to catch it.

Oh and a public service announcement for the Aussies: nacho hats are not a thing.

There is this amazing disconnect where every Australian I know thinks that you get nacho hats when you go to a sporting event and every American I know is like “wtf is a nacho hat?” And they are all really confused as to why we think it’s a thing.

Well this is why:

I remember when Cat was in the US she posted on her facebook that she was going to a baseball game and so many of her friends were like “OMG get a nacho hat!”

It never gets old for me, seeing the Aussie shock/disappointment and the US befuddlement (and social embarrassment, I like to think, at being unable to provide said nacho hats).

At the game we did get nachos in non-hat form. The chicken part of it was tasty but I couldn’t finish it because I found the cheese-like substance very disconcerting.

Our American friends say that baseball is boring but I thought it was pretty fun! Maybe on par with cricket but definitely not as action packed as Aussie Rules. Something I discovered is that runs are actually relatively infrequent – I think playing baseball on the old Nintendo system made me think that home runs were really common.

In between innings they would play stuff on the big screens; like they had a game with three cups and you had to follow which cup had the ball underneath, and a game where three dots raced against each other. It sounds lame but was actually pretty engrossing. These big bobble-headed mascots ran around the field for one of the breaks – I think maybe they were racing?

Also I discovered that at baseball games they actually do stand up and sing Take Me Out to the Ballgame. Awesome!

Throughout the game food vendors would wander around. I remember hot dogs, pizza, lemonade, peanuts, snocones, ice creams, churros and fairy floss. I was really excited by how giant the fairy floss was – I got a lot of pictures of the various fairy floss dudes. Look at this guy – the fairy floss is like … a good 1/4 of his size!

We all agreed that the Oakland A’s is a natural team for Australians to support since their symbol is a giant A and their colours are green and gold. It was really enjoyable sitting in the sun, drinking and eating and feeling very American.

Golden Gate Bridge

After the game we went to Vista Point to get a good view of the Golden Gate Bridge. Nancy warned us there was a big temperature difference in San Francisco so we knew to bring our jackets. A 30 minute drive took us from sunny and warm to windy and foggy. It was pretty cool – you could actually see the fog rolling along the ground.

There was a steady stream of tourists at Vista Point and the views were really lovely.

Dinner at San Tung

Afterwards we met up with Nancy’s brother at his apartment in Noe Valley. He recommended a Chinese place in Sunset called San Tung – apparently you have to wait like 1.5 hours for a seat so we ordered takeout to eat back at his place.

This was the line of people waiting for a table.

There was a similarly long line behind me for takeout. I don’t know if the line was people waiting to order or pick up, but apparently the trick to it is that you call up to order, go to the trolley and look for the bag with your phone number on it and then pay.

Expectations were high because Jesse said this was the best Chinese food in San Francisco. And all the Aussies were like … oh it is on.

I can’t remember exactly what we ordered. I think from the bottom going clockwise it’s their dry chicken wings (apparently a must-order), green beans, some beef dish, pork potsticker and vegie (I think) dumplings. We also ordered hot and sour soup:

The verdict? Extremely solid, though not the best Chinese food I’ve ever had. Joel and Nancy are going to have to take Jesse to some Melbourne restaurants and see how he thinks they compare. All up I think it came to about $70 for five people including a $10 tip so it was excellent value for great food.

Engagement Party and Taco Bar

The next day was Joel and Nancy’s engagement party! We met Nancy’s family and friends and everyone was so nice and easy to talk to.

Also they had a taco bar. A TACO BAR. This is a thing that needs to make its way to Melbourne because it is fanfreakingtastic.

There was a table with various sides, like grilled vegies, salad, guacamole, sour cream and salsa. I largely skipped that table because I can’t have vegies and salad when there are tacos to be had. I’m sorry but I’m just not that strong.

Here were the two guys at the bar. The first guy had grilled onion, jalapenos and tortillas. The second guy had a selection of meat – pork, beef, chicken and chorizo.

After the meat station there was a table with onion, coriander, two sauces (the red one was spicy and the green wasn’t) and sooo many limes. I’m not used to seeing so many limes at once – in Australia that’s like … a week’s salary worth of limes. The two trays in the background had rice and beans.

And my plate (with mojito in the background)! It was amazing.

I think either the pork or chorizo was my favourite but it was all great! Joel and I had 5 tacos each. James had 14. He said he probably would have been satisfied with 10 but when Nancy’s mum told us it was last call for tacos he panicked and got another round.

Unlimited tacos and mojitos all night. Heaven! I hear there was also delicious cake, but I had to weigh the opportunity cost and continued with the tacos. No regrets.

So yeah, those were our first two days in the Bay Area. It was so wonderful meeting everyone and catching up with Joel. With really great friends you can not see each other for years and then when you finally meet up it’s like not a day has gone by. =)

Also it was such a bad idea posting taco pictures. I’m so hungry now.